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Do not follow where the path may lead.
Go instead where there is no path and leave a trail.

- Ralph Waldo Emerson -

Photo Library

 

The images below are from the MirCorp's privately funded mission to the Mir space station, other manned missions to Mir, as well as photos of potential Citizen Explorers. High-resolution images are available where specified.

For a larger version these medium-resolution photos, click on individual images.


 
MirCorp Advertising A typical advertising opportunity available on Mir is illustrated in this computer-generated image. In this example, the MirCorp logo is placed on the exterior of the station's core module.
 

 
Dennis A. Tito, the first candidate for MirCorp's Citizen Explorer program, is shown during weightlessness training in a Russian Il-76 aircraft. Tito is a former U.S. space program engineer who founded Wilshire Associates, one of the pioneering firms in investment management consulting.

Download the high resolution version as a ZIP file (707 KB).

Dennis Tito
 

 
Orangereya experiment The Orangereya ("hothouse") experiment conducted by cosmonauts Sergei Zalyotin and Alexander Kalery successfully grew a number of plants in the near zero gravity conditions on board the Mir station. This was one of a wide range of experiments performed during the MirCorp-funded commercial mission to Mir.
 

 
 
Mission commander Sergei Zalyotin (wearing red shirt in photo at top), and flight engineer Alexander Kalery (in blue shirt, bottom photo) accomplished a full range of repair, maintenance and experiment tasks during their 73 days spent on Mir in the MirCorp-funded commercial space mission.

These two images of the cosmonauts were broadcast from Mir using the same transmission techniques that will be employed for the Internet space portal to be installed by MirCorp on an upcoming manned mission to Mir.

Sergei Zalyotin

Alexander Kalery

 

 
 
Mir Station At a total mass of 140 metric tons (308,560 lb.), Mir is an impressive 30 meters long by 33 meters wide (98 X 108 ft). Research is conducted within the facility's six modules in the areas of astrophysics, geophysics, materials and bio substance processing, medicine and biology, and techniques in space flight.

Download the high resolution version as a ZIP file (1,135 KB).

 

 
Mir is the most visited place in space. Since its launch in 1986, more than 100 cosmonauts and astronauts from 12 nations have lived on Mir and over 20,000 space experiment sessions have been performed. This makes it a truly international orbiting home and workplace.

Download the high resolution version as a ZIP file (6,575 KB).

Mir Station
 

 
A work area inside the Mir space station.   Charlie Precourt, Bonnie Dunbar and Greg Harbaugh listen to Gennady Strekalov play guitar during the STS-71 mission.
A work area inside the Mir space station.   Charlie Precourt, Bonnie Dunbar and Greg Harbaugh listen to Gennady Strekalov play guitar during the STS-71 mission.
 
 
A traditional in-flight portrait of the crews of Mir-21 and the Atlantis space shuttle.   From right to left, Greg Harbaugh and Gennady Strekalov connect a transfer hose to a water container.
 
 
At left is Mir's communications console with Mir-18 crew Vladimir Dezurov and Gennady Strekalov.   The crews of Mir-24 and STS-89 pose for a traditional photograph. On-board is the last American astronaut to serve on Mir, S.W. Thomas.
 

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